Metal roofing is featured prominently in three new idea homes under construction. One of them served as a showcase for products during the 2002 International Builders' Show.

Day-to-day construction progress on this 16,000-sq.-ft. showcase home near Dallas was shown on television and the Internet.
Metal roofing is featured prominently in three new idea homes under construction. One of them, in Atlanta, served as a showcase for products during the 2002 International Builders' Show, which took place there in February.

This 4,200-sq.-ft. home was commissioned by This Old House magazine and designed by Jeremiah Eck Architects of Boston. It features a screened-in porch capped with a gently curving "barrel vault" copper roof. A three-day open house was held there during the show. Other features included copper rain gutters, roof flashing, and custom copper eaves and chimney caps, along with all-copper plumbing to service five full bathrooms complete with whirlpool tubs and multiple-head "power showers."

A second idea home in Atlanta features high-tech "connectivity" being offered by a few homebuilders in the U.S. This concept includes a Category 5e structured wiring system for high tech entertainment, computers and networked Internet portals.

All of the copper tube and copper sheet for the Atlanta homes was provided by the Copper Development Association (CDA).

A third, 16,000-sq.-ft. home in Preston Hollow, Texas, also features extensive use of copper in the wiring and plumbing, along with an extensive amount of copper for the home's water-cooled hvac system and copper gutters. This 6 bedroom, 10 bath home can be viewed on www.michaelholigan.com/ projecthouse.

This is an area of the country that's known for its severe weather - especially tornadoes, thunderstorms and intense hail storms. For that reason, and because the house is being built to last for generations, a stone-coated steel roof from Gerard was specified. This magnificent slate-colored roof was installed by Horn Brothers, a nationwide roofing company based in Norcross, Georgia.

Some concrete and ceramic tile roofing material can compare with steel for resistance to damage from hail, according to builder Michael Holigan, "but for this year's Project House, we wanted to install a light weight, long-lasting roof - one that would not require us to adjust our framing specifications in order to support the weight. The Gerard shake gives you the sturdy, traditional hand-split wood look of shake in six rich colors."

Gerard's product was born in the early 1950s, according to the company, when a New Zealand industrialist visited England and noticed how well WWII corrugated steel-roof hangers had survived the punishing British climate. Upon returning home he developed a roofing tile pressed from galvanized steel, then coated it with a layer of Bitumen and crushed rock granules. In 1971 Gerard began manufacturing a re-engineered stone-coated steel roof panel, with improved adhesives and more stylish designs.