ACCA’s Larry Taylor issued a three-pronged challenge to America’s hvac contractors, and urged them to remember that small businesses are the foundation of the nation’s freedom.

Arguing that the hvacr contracting industry should not allow itself to be defined by its “lowest common denominator,” the chief elected officer of the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) challenged the industry to “stand up to the unscrupulous contractors who would rather steal a quick buck than build a business relationship.”

ACCA’s Larry Taylor, president of Air-Rite, Fort Worth, was speaking to the Texas Air Conditioning Contractors Association (TACCA) Annual Conference in November. Taylor issued a three-pronged challenge to America’s hvac contractors, and urged them to remember that small businesses are the foundation of the nation’s freedom.

“We still believe in the American dream because we see it come true every day,” Taylor said. “The notion that one person can one day open a business and grow it, prosper in it, just because he or she wants to and is determined to see it succeed — that is a notion foreign to the terrorists and many other countries of the world.”

Contractors must “reverse the process” in which they find their industry losing credibility with the buying public, Taylor said. “The fact is that there are some contractors out there who do not deserve to be in business. They lie to their customers. They inflate their prices. They provide unnecessary services and claim to have provided some services that they have not.

Taylor said contractors must first “accept training costs as a necessary part of business, make it part of our business plans, and make successful completion of training as much a part of employee evaluation as anything else.”

Second, Taylor continued, “We must embrace NATE certification … It is not enough to certify one of your technicians. If we are to convince the homeowners and facility managers of America that our technicians are professionals, then we have to prove it. Show that they are certifiable professionals who meet the quality standards of the industry nationwide.”

Finally, Taylor urged reputable contractors nationwide to “embrace ACCA membership. By ACCA, I mean ‘One ACCA’ — the ACCA that exists in local chapters, state chapters, and the national organization.”

According to Taylor, if all reputable contractors embraced these three initiatives and acted on them, “then we would go a long way toward restoring our credibility,” he said.