The heating and cooling system for a new North Platte High School in Nebraska represents one of the largest GeoExchange installations in the state.

GeoExchange continues to make inroads. The heating and cooling system for a new North Platte High School in Nebraska represents one of the largest such installations in the state.

The 276,000-sq.-ft. school will be heated and cooled by a 730-ton GeoExchange system designed by Farris Engineering, Omaha. It incorporates variable speed pumping, sensible/latent heat recovery for ventilation air, and radiant floor heating for the locker room/shower areas. In addition, the school has two gymnasiums, a 1,200-seat auditorium, extensive commons area and a large media center.

Sports practice fields outside contain the school’s 416 6-in. dia. boreholes, drilled 320-ft. deep, linked to three 60-hp. variable speed circulation pumps and 180 water-source heat pumps, ranging from 3⁄4 to 20-ton capacity. The school will open for classes in the fall of 2002.

A similar school building, Birdville High School in the Fort Worth, Texas, suburbs, is now two years old and at just over 300,000-sq.-ft. still one of the largest, single buildings in the U.S. to be heated and cooled via GeoExchange. The system includes 160 heat pumps and a total of 1,086 vertical wells. The school is expected to save $174,000 annually in hvac costs.

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